Glasgow City Boats Guide to the Isle of Gigha

Glasgow city boats guide to marinas / islands 

The Isle of Gigha – Scotland not the Caribbean!
55 41 N 005 44 W 
Distance from Largs 75 miles 
Distance from Oban 50 miles 

Highest astronomical tide 1.2 
Lowest astronomical tide 01.m 
MHWS 1.1m 
MLWS 0.3m

One of our favourite runs ashore is the Isle of Gigha. 
Gigha is a small island situated West of the Kintyre peninsula of approx 5 miles long and 1 mile wide. 

The main landing area is Ardminish bay on the East side of the island. 
It is sheltered in most directions apart from Easterlies. 

In the summer there is a good sized floating pontoon put out, with depths between 2metres and 2.7 metres at MLWS. The pontoons in Ardminish Bay are very accessible for most types of small craft along with the 18 visitors yacht moorings which will accommodate nearly every size of pleasure boat. There is an anchorage also with good holding. 

£15 per night for a mooring, £20 per night for the pontoon with a £5 day time rate. Payment by honesty box at top of Pontoon’s. 
More info and berthing payment by calling Isle of Gigha Trust Office during working hours (Mon – Fri 09:00 – 17:00) by card over the phone by calling 01583 427 300

Tides are generally small in Gigha and currents not strong in the anchorage or pontoons. 

Fuel is available at the Ardmenish stores and post office, a short walk from the Pontoon’s. The local shop is very well stocked with provisions of every type and for every occasion, including fuel for vehicles and boats.

Water and showers available at the boat house restaurant / camp site beside the pontoons. 

At the north end of the island there is the twin beaches which are good anchorages. One is known as the “queens beach” as it is said it is the queens favourite beach. She used to walk her corgis when ashore when the royal yacht Britannia was anchored in the bay. As you can see from the photo of the two beaches there is plenty room to anchor and find shelter. 

All the main parts of the island are within twenty minutes walk but the whole island is accessible for hikers who can also view many types of local wildlife, including falcons, eagles, dolphins, porpoises, basking shark and minki whale, also there are many sandy bays which range from easily accessible to difficult but rewarding when the effort is made.

The population is at around 165, daytrippers in the summer double that number on a reasonable day.
Achamore Gardens have a good variety of exotic and indigenous species to view as you wonder around its relaxing tree sheltered paths, a new head gardener and some new investment for the spring of 2020 make this an exciting time, a wonderful view point above the western edge of the gardens provide a fantastic panoramic view of islands of Islay and Jura and the North channel.

The four wind turbines are accessible to anyone who want to embrace Gigha’s eco power.

The world famous Michelin guide noted boathouse restaurant and the super Ardminish bistro in the Gigha hotel are both excellent places to taste local produce prepared to the highest standard, especially the famous Gigha halibut.

The local activities centre provides cycle hire, kyaak hire and also paddle boards and pedilos.

The nine hole golf course is an ideal course for those seeking an uninterrupted round.

With panoramic views of the Kintyre and Knapdale peninsulas it is ideal for the keen or occasional golfer.

We can not recommend visiting the beautiful Isle of Gigha enough, you have to go there to appreciate it! Sitting on the beach on a summers day with an Ice cold pint of Perroni is magical!

A big thanks goes to local Gigha skipper John Bannatyne for providing information for this feature – Much appreciated.

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